Partners EAP Four Seasons Graphic Partners Employee Assistance Program Top Banner
Work & Life Resources Webinars & Events About EAP & Services
Search:  
 



  Print This PagePrint This Page

Additional Bankruptcy Questions

What Does It Cost to File for Bankruptcy?

It now costs $209 to file for bankruptcy, whether for one person or a married couple. The court may allow you to pay this filing fee in installments if you cannot pay all at once. If you hire an attorney you will also have to pay the attorney's fees you agree to.

What Property Can I Keep?

In a Chapter 7 case, you can keep all property which the law says is "exempt" from the claims of creditors. You can choose between your exemptions under your state law or under federal law. In many cases, the federal exemptions are better.

Federal exemptions include:

  • $ 16,400 in equity in your home and changing with consumer price index increases;
  • $ 2,400 in equity in your car and changing with consumer price index increases;
  • $ 400 per item in any household goods up to a total of $8,000 and changing with consumer price index increases;
  • $ 1,500 in things you need for your job (tools, books, etc.);
  • $ 800 in any property, plus part of the unused exemption in your home;
  • Your right to receive certain benefits such as social security, unemployment compensation, veteran's benefits, public assistance, and pensions -- regardless of the amount.

The amounts of the exemptions are doubled when a married couple files together.

In determining whether property is exempt, you must keep a few things in kind. The value of property is not the amount you paid for it, but what it is worth now. Especially for furniture and cars, this may be a lot less than what you paid or what it would cost to buy a replacement.

You also only need to look at your equity in property. This means that you count your exemptions against the full value minus any money that you owe on mortgages or liens. For example, if you own a $ 50,000 house with a $ 40,000 mortgage, you count your exemptions against the $ 10,000 which is your equity if you sell it.

While your exemptions allow you to keep property even in a Chapter 7 case, your exemptions do not make any difference to the right of a mortgage holder or car loan creditor to take the property to cover the debt if you are behind. In a Chapter 13 case, you can keep all of your property if your plan meets the requirements of the bankruptcy law. In most cases you will have to pay the mortgages or liens as you would if you did not file bankruptcy.

What Will Happen to My Home and Car If I File Bankruptcy?

In most cases you will not lose your home or car during your bankruptcy case as long as your equity in the property is fully exempt. Even if your property is not fully exempt, you will be able to keep it if you pay its non-exempt value to creditors in Chapter 13.

However, some of your creditors may have a "security interest" in your home, automobile or other personal property. This means that you gave that creditor a mortgage on the home or put your other property up as collateral for the debt. Bankruptcy does not make the payments on that debt; the creditor may be able to take and sell the home or the property, during or after the bankruptcy case.

There are several ways that you can keep collateral or mortgaged property after you file bankruptcy. You can agree to keep making your payments on the debt until it is paid in full. Or you can pay the creditor the amount that the property you want to keep is worth. In some cases involving fraud or other improper conduct by the creditor you may be able to challenge the debt. If you put up your household goods as collateral for a loan (other than a loan to buy them), you can usually keep your property without making any more payments on that debt.

Can I Own Anything After Bankruptcy?

Yes! Many people believe they cannot own anything for a period of time after filing for bankruptcy. This is not true. You can keep your exempt property and anything you obtain after the bankruptcy is filed. However, if you receive an inheritance, a property settlement, or life insurance benefits within 180 days after filing bankruptcy, that money or property may have to be paid to your creditors if the property or money is not exempt.

Will Bankruptcy Wipe Out All My Debts?

Yes, with some exceptions. Bankruptcy will not normally wipe out:

  • money owed for child support or alimony, fines, and some taxes;
  • debts not listed on your bankruptcy petition;
  • loans you got by knowingly giving false information to a creditor, who reasonably relied on it in making you the loan;
  • debts resulting from "willful and malicious" harm;
  • student loans owed to a school or government body, except if:
    • the loan first became due more than 7 years before the bankruptcy was filed or
    • the court decides that payment would be an undue hardship;
  • mortgages and other liens which are not paid in the bankruptcy case (but bankruptcy will wipe out your obligation to pay any additional money if the property is sold by the creditor).

Will I Have to Go to Court?

In most bankruptcy cases, you only have to go to a proceeding called the "meeting of creditors" to meet with the bankruptcy trustee and any creditor who chooses to come. Most of the time, this meeting will be a short and simple procedure where you are asked a few questions about your bankruptcy forms and your financial situation.

Occasionally, if complications arise, or if you choose to dispute a debt, you may have to appear before a judge at a hearing. If you need to go to court, you will receive notice of the court date and time from the court and/or from your attorney.

Will Bankruptcy Affect My Credit?

There is no clear answer to this question. Unfortunately, if you are behind on your bills, your credit may already be bad. Bankruptcy will probably not make things any worse. The fact that you have filed a bankruptcy can appear on your credit record for 10 years. But since bankruptcy wipes out your old debts, you are likely to be in a better position to pay your current bills, and you may be able to get new credit.

What Else Should I Know?

Utility services - Public utilities, such as the electric company, cannot refuse or cut off service because you have filed for bankruptcy. However, the utility can require a deposit for future service, and you do have to pay bills which arise after bankruptcy is filed.

Discrimination - An employer or government agency cannot discriminate against you because you have filed for bankruptcy.

Driver's license - If you lost your license solely because you could not pay court-ordered damages caused by an accident, bankruptcy will allow you to get your license back.

Co-signers - If someone has co-signed a loan with you and you file for bankruptcy, the co-signer may have to pay your debt.

Remember: The law often changes. Each case is different. This pamphlet is meant to give you general information and not to give you specific legal advice.

Used with Permission of Neighborhood Legal Services, Inc. http://www.nls.org/

 

This information is general legal information that may or may not pertain to your particular circumstance. It does not substitute for a consultation with an attorney regarding your specific situation.

 

We provide access (links) to some external websites for your convenience. The EAP is not responsible for the availability, accuracy, or content of those outside resources or sites, nor does it endorse them. This site is not an attempt to provide any counseling or other type of intervention.

For more information or to discuss legal concerns please contact Partners Employee Assistance Program at 1-866-724-4EAP.

In case of emergency, please call 911 or your local hospital emergency service.


This content was last modified on: 06/06/2017

Partners EAP is not a service for the general public.

In case of emergency, please call 911 or your local hospital emergency service.

Call Us: 1-866-724-4EAP